Discoveries in My Morning Hike

Woke up this morning, I was wondering whether I should be making my morning hike as there were some thunder storms during the night.

The treks will be soggy and maybe even slippery.

We have the wettest April in 60 years and I have not been able to hike for worrying that the paths are too slippery.

The sun has come out and I decided to take a chance.

Half an hour into the walk, I noticed these white flowers fallen on the trek; they are still fresh and not trampled over. They look like a painting.IMG_1861

Continuing on, I was somewhat surprised by what I saw.IMG_1863

A little red crab was blocking my way. I was quite puzzled as I have never seen them before at this hillside location.

OK, the crab maybe 20 meters away from a mountain stream. I gather these crabs are amphibious. He was looking quite angry at me with his little bright eyes.IMG_1869

Then continuing on, deeper into the forest was this tree which still has some red maple leaves at this time of the year.

All I had was a smartphone. The tree is a bit out of focus, but never mind, I know my readers will forgive me with the somewhat blur picture.IMG_1870

Then I stumbled on some fungi or mushrooms on a tree stump. I know some of them are poisonous.

Towards the end of my hike, I found another tree stump.IMG_1872

It looks rather abstract, with some fungi attaching to it.

I was thinking of the theme for this week’s Photo Challenge – Abstract – does it look abstract.

I wish I had taken a proper camera with me.

Anyway, please enjoy the pictures – as much as I have enjoyed my early morning walk.

 

50 thoughts on “Discoveries in My Morning Hike

  1. Great photos and an interesting post. May I just suggest that you comment on what is in the photo ‘before’ the photo rather than after. This would help lead us to see what you are focusing on in the photo. Kind regards.

    • A good suggestion – I will try to do that.
      What I don’t like is to end up with just one or two sentences between two big photos – I want more space but a bit too lazy to write in between.

    • Don’t be lazy! Your posts are interesting and there is so much detail you could share with us, of the amazing things you experience and see. think of your 5 senses and write about how you experience each, in these amazing places. Thanks for replying.

    • I am not lazy when you come to think of preparing 7 posts a week; I am lazy when writing each post though.
      I just can’t say in each post that all my senses were filled.
      Your advice is taken!

  2. Hi Michael, thank you for taking us through your stroll and showing us what you discovered on the way — your home would always have a different vibe for me, since i am only able to be in the concrete jungle whenever able to visit. would love to explore farther on when God allows us another trip to your home. have a blessed day, Michael πŸ™‚

  3. It’s interesting to hear that you are having a record wet April, because we are the opposite. We’re having the hottest driest Autumn ever. Some clothing shops are going broke because no one’s buying winter clothing.

  4. Yes it does look abstract and I’m glad you managed your morning walk. Imagine finding a crab!? Thos white flowers are so pretty ~ I guess the wind and rain blew them off the tree just like our Magnolia trees in UK. It is such a shame that they are on the tree flowering for such a short time.
    Your photos look fine to me ~ phone or not! Its a joy to share your walk.

    • I guess that the red crabs have become land based, like those at Christmas Island.
      See description from Wikipedia:
      Like most land crabs, red crabs use gills to breathe and must take great care to conserve body moisture. Although red crabs are diurnal, they usually avoid direct sunlight so as not to dry out. Despite lower temperatures and higher humidity, red crabs are almost completely inactive at night. Red crabs also dig burrows to shelter themselves from the sun and will usually stay in the same burrow through the year. During the dry season, they will cover the entrance to their burrows with a loose wad of leaves to maintain high humidity in their burrow and will virtually disappear for 3 months until the start of the wet season. Apart from their breeding season, Red crabs are solitary animals and will defend their burrow from intruders

    • This is what Wiki says about red crab ( at Christmas Island):
      Like most land crabs, red crabs use gills to breathe and must take great care to conserve body moisture. Although red crabs are diurnal, they usually avoid direct sunlight so as not to dry out. Despite lower temperatures and higher humidity, red crabs are almost completely inactive at night.[5] Red crabs also dig burrows to shelter themselves from the sun and will usually stay in the same burrow through the year.[5] During the dry season, they will cover the entrance to their burrows with a loose wad of leaves to maintain high humidity in their burrow and will virtually disappear for 3 months until the start of the wet season. Apart from their breeding season, Red crabs are solitary animals and will defend their burrow from intruders

  5. I enjoyed your commentary & these photos very much — especially the carpet of fresh white flower blossoms. The ecosystem reminds me a lot of a walk I took in rainforest up Seymour Mountain in North Vancouver, so I wonder if the climate (perhaps because of altitude?) is somewhat similar.

  6. A nice walk Michael. My morning walk, though 7kms round-trip implies dodging cars, crossing streets at the perils of one’s life. And no red crabs along the way. πŸ˜‰

    • Hi, I walk approximately 7km too. There are two routes, one up the hills which gives me fresh air and next to trees, flora and fauna etc but the path can be quite wet after the rain. The other is a costal route – down the village, underneath the railway until I reach the coast, then along the coast until it hits the town.

    • Sounds lovely. maybe you could take us by both routes step by step so to speak? Since you post a photo a day? Do route 1 first one photo at a time, then the other?

    • I have been doing that. Some of the foggy coastal shots I showed recently belong to this category. This may temporary solve the problem.

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