Weekly Photo Challenge: Curved (Bridges)

This week’s DP photo challenge is Curve.

Those who have been following me know that I am a fan of bridges; I  like them as they connect one place to another, overcoming obstacles like river, sea, rivers, gorges etc.

They improve connectivity which we all need.

In the early part of my career, I have been designing and project engineering  some bridges which still stand today, after 40 years of their design and over three decades  of their construction.

This post is about curve bridges; in fact, they are mostly masonry bridges.17-12-2004 5-31-04 PM_0022A

In early part of the human history, we have discovered that if we arrange the masonry or stones in the shape of arches, the resulting structure will be put into compression for which stones have a lot of compressive strength.16-12-2004 4-43-31 PM_0000

The stone or masonry of course will need to be cemented together so that there will be a smooth flow of compression in the arches. Human beings have been very clever in erecting curved spans over torrential waters etc..scan10007

Many of the bridges were built on this principle and quite a lot of them have lasted for hundreds of years.

Here I will first showcase some of the arch bridges built in the West, the first two examples were taken in Spain, namely, Seville and also Toledo.

The third one is a medieval bridge near France in the area known as Cahorrea.CIMG0218

The fourth one was taken in Central Park, NYC.

The fifth one was taken in Switzerland, this is a contemporary structure with vertical memebers transferring loads from the highway onto a concrete arch. DSCF1124

The rest of the bridges are built in the East.DSCF0286

The one with three curved spans over a river, looking like three contagious ribbons were taken in Shinkoku, Japan.DSCF6492

This is followed by a three span masonry bridge in the West Lake China, creating an attractive reflection in the West Lake waters.

The last one with the red Autumn foliage was captured in South Korea.DSCF3377

I could go on and on, citing more examples – if I can get hold of my old pictures.

For the time being, please enjoy 🙂

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Curve ( Bird Nest )

This week’s DP photo challenge is Curve.

I will never be able to count the number of curves in this Bird Nest in Beijing, China.DSCF2529

The structure is three dimensionally curved.

the curves look random but natural.

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Curve

This week’s DP challenge is Curve.

This castle in the Baltic is curve and rounded.Baltic Capitals  15-Aug-09 009

The whole masonry wall is cylindrical with small windows.

I especially like the texture of the wall which is so rugged and which gives the picture a special mood.

Weekly Photo Challenge : Curve

This week’s DP photo challenge is Curve.

An immediate picture comes to mind is a picture taken at the Kai Tak Cruise terminal, Hong Kong.DSCF0827

This new cruise terminal is a big show off of the use of curves in the architecture.

Whichever angle you look at it,it embodies many curves which are aesthetically pleasing.DSCF0823

Also appended here is a photo taken of the same curved arch, underneath which shows a part of the Victoria harbour.

Rudale Palace in Latvia (8)

In fact, I was most impressed by what I have seen inside the palace – the paintings and the furniture.

It features how the royal family has lived.DSC_0234

Here are a couple of photos showing the rooms within the palace.DSC_0238

This is how the Palace is introduced in Wikipedia:

Rundāle Palace , formerly also Ruhenthal and Ruhendahl is one of the two major baroque palaces built for the Dukes of Courland  in what is now Latvia, the other being Jelgava Palace. The palace was built in two periods, from 1736 until 1740 and from 1764 until 1768. It is situated at Pilsrundāle, 12 km west of Bauska.

Rundale Palace in Latvia (7)

 

In fact, I was most impressed by what I have seen inside the palace – the paintings and the furniture.

It features how the royal family has lived.DSC_0229

Here are a couple of photos showing the rooms within the palace.DSC_0225

This is how the Palace is introduced in Wikipedia:

Rundāle Palace , formerly also Ruhenthal and Ruhendahl is one of the two major baroque palaces built for the Dukes of Courland  in what is now Latvia, the other being Jelgava Palace. The palace was built in two periods, from 1736 until 1740 and from 1764 until 1768. It is situated at Pilsrundāle, 12 km west of Bauska.

Rhinos that Appear in the Night

This is a smartphone photo sent to me yesterday by my wife while travelling in Namibia.

Two rhinos appeared at the waterhole during the night.3d3ce1a9-9624-4d50-b172-a56a76c28662

The location is the Etosha National Park in Namibia.

Maybe the photo is not sharp enough as it was taken without much light and at a distance.

The wifi there is weak; nevertheless, I am happy to have received it.

 

Rudale Palace in Latvia (6)

 

I was wondering whether these two pictures are more suited to this week’s DP Photo Challenge on the theme of Pure.

As I entered into the palace, some of the figures on the ceiling attracted my attention.DSC_0219A

They all show babies in their pure form.

I am not sure of the stories behind these figures, maybe, some of the readers can advise.

As a matter of fact, these pictures were quite difficult to be taken as the whole thing was in off white color.DSC_0218A

This is how the Palace is introduced in Wikipedia:

Rundāle Palace , formerly also Ruhenthal and Ruhendahl is one of the two major baroque palaces built for the Dukes of Courland  in what is now Latvia, the other being Jelgava Palace. The palace was built in two periods, from 1736 until 1740 and from 1764 until 1768. It is situated at Pilsrundāle, 12 km west of Bauska.

The Dark Sky Reserve in Namibia

It is amazing that the Namibia desert is declared as a Dark Sky Reserve. The following is quoted from an article in CNN:
It’s so far from any human center that the light pollution is non-existent, meaning the night skies are among the darkest on Earth.
The International Dark-Sky Association, the go-to authority on light pollution, has certified the region as one of its Dark Sky Reserves because of the spectacular starry night.
What’s most amazing about a sky so dark is how bright it actually is.
The Milky Way stretches overhead, with the Magellanic Clouds in bursts of light to the side.
Familiar constellations of the southern skies suddenly have millions of neighbors.
These groupings are normally invisible even from small towns.
This is how humans saw the sky for thousands of years.ae64efed-84fc-4672-933f-d204cd01b8ee
Perhaps the picture here taken by my wife helps to explain the Dark Sky Reserve in Namibia.