The House of the Dancing Water (6)

There are so many photos I would like to upload for the show.

One of these is the pavilion scene with acrobats flying in the air, above the pavilion.DSCF0677

Again, with water jets coming up from the movable platform and fantastic lights.

Please enjoy ūüôā

 

The House of Dancing Water (4)

I am starting a new series based on photos taken earlier this week in Macau.

This is part of the show known as The House of Dancing Water.

All photos were taken with dancers on the stage, water jets coming up (or down) as if it were from fountains or pouring rain.DSCF0727

All photos were taken at a very slow speed and a high ISO.

I like the silhouettes of dancers in particular.

The House of Dancing Water (3)

I am starting a new series based on photos taken earlier this week in Macau.

This is part of the show known as The House of Dancing Water.

All photos were taken with dancers on the stage, water jets coming up (or down) as if it were from fountains or pouring rain.DSCF0726

All photos were taken at a very slow speed and a high ISO.

I like the silhouettes of dancers in particular.

The House of Dancing Water (2)

I am starting a new series based on photos taken earlier this week in Macau.

This is part of the show known as The House of Dancing Water.

All photos were taken with dancers on the stage, water jets coming up (or down) as if it were from fountains or pouring rain.DSCF0724

All photos were taken at a very slow speed and a high ISO.

I like the silhouettes of dancers in particular.

Shangri-La (ť¶ôś†ľťáĆśčČ)

We finally landed at the DiQing¬†airport, 10,761 ft ( 3,280m) above sea level in Zhong¬†Dian, province of Yunnan where it borders with Tibet and Sichuan. Allegedly, it was in¬†Zhong¬†Dian¬†(now renamed Shangri-La) that the aircraft had a crashed landing in the film “Lost Horizon” based on¬†the¬†novel by James Hilton in 1933.

At last, we were high above the clouds!  We  were greeted by rain and snow in this land of beautiful and mysterious snow capped mountains. On reaching the hotel, we were delighted by the warmth of the place and impressed by the color and  decor of our room.

We anxiously headed out to the Lake Nappa and found that it was almost dry at this time of the year. Whilst appreciating the vastness and emptiness of the area,  a buffalo  charged quickly towards us!

In the middle of nowhere, we found this little boy, sitting terribly alone by himself, next to a small fire. I was intrigued by the scornful look on his face which was totally incompatible with the tranquility and peace which Shangri-La is known for.

In the Tibet dialect, Shangri-La¬† means “the sun and moon in one’s heart”.

With the air so thin at this attitude, walking up and down the hills was no easy task. We treaded slowly and breathed heavily.

We were lucky to see local people in their colorful and diverse customs walking round and round a circular golden tower, praying and chanting. It was just heavenly.

When dusk finally came, we went to a see a cultural performance. The dancers showed so much energy in their spectacular dances. The people in Shangri-La are just born dancers and singers. For the first time, we have Yak for dinner.

When we have acclimatized to the thin air, sadly,  it was time to make our move and  say goodbye to this mysterious land of mountains and we bid goodbye to all those we come to know of.

We took on our return flight descending all the way down from a high attitude of 10,761 ft towards Kunming.

As with visiting any other places, once you have been there, the place may no longer appear to be  mysterious. However, deep in my heart, it is still a Utopia; a place where you can find perfect harmony between yourself and the mountains.