Weekly Photo Challenge: Grid ( China)

Screen doors or windows are quite common in China.

We were up in the mountains of Zhangzhejia, China.

In fact, we got into a  restaurant and trying to stay there as long as possible as a heavy fog has set in.007

I have nothing to do and naturally grapped my camera and took a shot out of the screen window.

My visibility was only a few feet; all I could see was some trees just outside the window.

The second picture was a casual shot outside a temple in Yunnan.DSCF2873

There was a long grid of red columns outside the temple.

Also, there was a grid of squares up on the roof, all artistically painted.

The third picture shows a grid of screen doors in the Hanging Temple in Datong.DSCF2448

These doors are very old but not adequately maintained.

The fourth picture was again taken in Yunnan.

We were having tea in a tea house overviewing Lijiang.

The view outside the screen windows was just beautiful.DSC_0179

The fifth picture was taken in Luoping.

This shows a display of various types of screens in a typical Chinese room commonly found at the time.DSCF3025

The last one was taken within a temple which we stopped by in the Three Gorges cruise trip.

The picture shows the grid of columns supporting the temple roof, as well as the grid of patterns on the colorful roof.DSCF6255


From these pictures, it could be seen that the Oriental type of grid can be quite different from the Western ones.

Travel Theme: Multiples (2)

This is my second attempt at Alisa’s theme “Multiples” for this week. While I like nature and photographing nature, I also like photographing still objects. For a change, this post is not about nature.

Again, my photos are taken in various places. I am glad that I can show them in a set under a theme.  On their own, it would be rather difficult to present the individual pictures. When drafting  this post, I looked up the dictionary for the meaning of multiple. Usually, I am given a mathematical interpretation as to what is a multiple. I guess multiple may mean more than two (which is called couple or duplet etc). Here are some of the “Multiples” which have impressed us in our travels.

High up in Shangrila, Yunnan, we spotted these multiple timber screen doors in a temple. We liked the fine wood carving and the gold color on them.DSC_0058

Some very Chinese styled red lanterns at “Yellow Crane Tower”, a historic tower in WuChang, China, swaying in the wind.DSCF6108

Multiple umbrellas affording shade to visitors in the Resonant Desert in Inner Mongolia, China.DSCF2264

Multiple Aobaos at the Masuoleum of Genghis Khan in Inner Mongolia.DSCF2316

Multiple columns to the Celcus Library at Ephesus, Turkey.CIMG0226

Multiple columns and facades at the Dolmacbache Palace, facing the Bospohrus in Istanbul, Turkey.CIMG0544

Multiple ornamental columns and statues arranged in a semi-circle at Hero Square, Budapest.DSCF0148

Multiple arches seen in Lithuania, while travelling in the Baltic countries.DSC_0365

So, the world is full of  interesting “Multiples”!