Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up ( Blue Mosque )

This week’s DP photo challenge is Look Up.

It is hard not to look up the domes of the Blue Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.CIMG0452

It must be one of the greatest Islamic architecture of all times.

The place is also beautifully lit with lights arranged in a spiral pattern.CIMG0412

You can wander around there for hours, with most of the time looking up to appreciate the beauty and grandness of the architecture.CIMG0451

Here is an introduction of the architecture from Wikipedia:

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque has five main domes, six minarets, and eight secondary domes. The design is the culmination of two centuries of Ottoman mosque development. It incorporates some Byzantine Christian elements of the neighboring Hagia Sophia with traditional Islamic Architecture and is considered to be the last great mosque of the classical period. The architect, Sedefkar Mehmed Aga, synthesized the ideas of his master Sinan, aiming for overwhelming size, majesty and splendour.CIMG0449

Please enjoy🙂

The Ephesus Picture

Ephesus, Turkey is an interesting place.

If I were to choose a picture for this place, I would post a picture of the Library of Celsus.CIMG0234

I have not posted this picture before; this shows great details of the library.

Below is a description of the library of Celsus from Wikipedia:

The library of Celsus is an ancient Roman Building in Ephesus, Anatolia, now part of Selcuk, Turkey. It was built in honour of the Roman Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus (completed in 135 AD) by Celsus’ son, Gaius Julius Aquila (consul, 110 AD). The library was built to store 12,000 scrolls and to serve as a mausoleum for Celsus, who is buried in a crypt beneath the library.

The interior of the library was destroyed, supposedly by an earthquake in 262 A.D. and the facade by another earthquake in the tenth or eleventh century A.D. It lay in ruins for centuries, until the façade was re-erected  by archaeologists between 1970 and 1978.

The Cappadocia Picture

There are many photos I can chose from Cappadocia, Turkey as the place is photogenic.

The one I like best was taken towards the end of the day when the tourists have left the place.

With nobody around, it looks quite surreal and moody.CIMG0384A

The path leads your eyes to the forest of stone columns and the clouds were adding to the mood.

It looks as somewhere out of the world!



Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle ( Blue Mosque)

The Blue Mosque and other similar construction have made use of domes/ arches spanning in different directions creating a huge space below for the congregation of worshipers.

This is quite unlike the churches in Europe where cathedrals usually adopted narrow and steep arches limiting the space below.CIMG0412A

The Blue mosque thus show multiple circles on the roof which are really awesome.

In the first picture, I have attempted to give it a blue tone – so in my imagination, it is literally a blue mosques.CIMG0412

I have also uploaded the original picture for comparison.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Extra(ordinary) Turkey

This is the biggest sink hole I have ever seen – Obruk Han Gölü, doline (sinkhole) behind the old caravansary near Cappadocia.

We came across this sink hole while we were near a medieval dwelling for the travelling merchants in Turkey.CIMG0272A

It was so big that it filled the whole of the photo, despite zooming out to the fullest.

If you look carefully, near to the bottom of the edge of the hole stood a couple of people and there was a flock of white birds flying in the air against the water in the sink hole.

A magnificent view!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Monochromatic ( Basilica Cistern)

This is not to be missed if you are in Istanbul, Turkey.

Not too far from Hagia Sophia is the Basilica Cistern. One of the largest of the several hundred underground cisterns in the area.CIMG0605

I was happy to capture this monochromatic photo in the cistern using a compact camera without resorting to tripod.

Please enjoy!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Beneath Your Feet ( Tiles)

I like walking on cobble stones , however, I also like walking on interestingly paved tiles.

Here are two photos.

The first one shows the tiled pattern in the busy area of Macau.DSCF0787

I like the wavy tile pattern.

The second picture was taken in Ephesus, Turkey.CIMG0223

These ancient mosaic tiles in a pattern were laid on the pavement when Ephesus was a thriving city.

At the moment, you can still walk on these tiles!